Department of Psychology and Neuroscience (GRAD)

Department of Psychology and Neuroscience

http://psychology.unc.edu

Donald T. Lysle, Chair

Jonathan Abramowitz, Associate Chair

Regina M. Carelli, Associate Chair

The Department of Psychology and Neuroscience offers training for the doctor of philosophy degree in six areas of psychology: behavioral and integrative neuroscience, clinical, cognitive, developmental, quantitative, and social. Each program is designed to acquaint students thoroughly with the theoretical and research content of a particular specialty and to train them in the research skills needed to become competent, creative investigators in their specialty area. In addition, the programs focus on the development of competence in appropriate professional skills.

While many of the requirements for a Ph.D. degree vary with the specialty program, certain requirements apply to all psychology graduate students. Each student must

  1. Engage in research during each year of enrollment
  2. Pass a Ph.D. written examination
  3. Pass a Ph.D. oral examination
  4. Submit an acceptable dissertation and pass a final oral examination
  5. In most cases, serve as a teaching assistant or teach a course for at least one academic year

Additional information about graduate training in these areas may be obtained from the department's Web site. New students are accepted for admission in the fall semester only. Individuals seeking the M.A. degree only are not accepted.

Following the faculty member's name is a section number that students should use when registering for independent studies, reading, research, and thesis and dissertation courses with that particular professor.

Professors

Jonathan Abramowitz (231), Psychopathology, Prevention, and Treatment of Anxiety and Related Problems, Especially Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Jennifer Arnold (221), Psychological Processes Underlying Language Production and Comprehension in Both Adults and Children
Donald H. Baucom (104), Couple Therapy, Individual Psychopathology, and Couple Functioning; Health Concerns in a Couple/Family Context
Daniel Bauer (224), Structural Equation Models, Multilevel Models, Mixture Models, Analysis of Change
Kenneth Bollen (268), Structural Equation Models, Longitudinal Methods, Latent Curve Models
Regina M. Carelli (187), Neurobiology of Reward, Drug Abuse, Behavioral Neurophysiology
Martha Cox (206), Family Processes and Child Social and Emotional Development, Poverty, Family and Child Transitions
Patrick J. Curran (195), Structural Equation Modeling, Longitudinal Data Analysis, High-Risk Adolescent Development
Barbara Fredrickson (229), Emotions; Positive Emotions; Social, Cognitive, and Physical Effects of Pleasant Emotional States; Flourishing Mental Health
Karen M. Gil (181), Health Psychology, Chronic Illness, Stress and Coping, Pain Management, Cancer Survivorship
Kelly Giovanello (232), Cognitive Neuroscience of Human Learning and Memory; Behavioral, Neuropsychological, and Functional Neuroimaging Studies of Relational Memory
Peter C. Gordon (170), Psychology of Language, Cognitive Neuroscience
Mark Hollins (17), Sensory and Perceptual Aspects of Pain and Touch
Joseph B. Hopfinger (198), Neural Mechanisms of Visual Attention; Electrophysiological, Neuroimaging, and Eye-Tracking Studies of Attentional Control, Effects of Memory on Attention
Andrea M. Hussong (188), Adolescent Substance Use; Models of Peer, Family, and Affective Risk
Deborah Jones (223), Family Transmission of Mental and Physical Health in Underserved and At-Risk Families and the Development and Implementation of Family-Based Prevention and Intervention Programs for These Groups
Beth E. Kurtz-Costes (142), Development of Motivational Beliefs in Childhood and Adolescence, Family and Cultural Influences on Development
Donald T. Lysle (155), Neuroimmunology, Neurobiology of Drug Abuse, Evolutionary Theory
Neil Mulligan (211), Cognitive Psychology, Human Memory, Implicit vs. Explicit Memory, Episodic Memory, Attention and Memory
Peter A. Ornstein (28), Cognitive Development, Development of Learning and Memory
Abigail T. Panter (144), Evaluation, Measurement, Advanced Quantitative Methods, Survey Methodology, Personality, Educational Diversity in Higher Education
Keith Payne (227), Social Cognition, Stereotyping, Prejudice, Emotions
David L. Penn (196), Social Cognition and Social Impairment in Schizophrenia, Stigma, Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Severe Mental Illness
Mitchell J. Picker (131), Discriminative Stimulus Properties of Drugs, Tolerance and Cross-Tolerance, Behavioral Effects of Opioid and Neuroleptic Drugs
Mitch Prinstein (222), Developmental Psychopathology, Interpersonal Models of Adolescent Depression and Suicide, Peer Contagion of Health Risk Behaviors
Paschal Sheeran (267), Self-Regulation; How People Direct Their Own Thoughts, Feelings, and Behaviors to Achieve Their Goals
Todd Thiele (203), Neurobiology and Genetics of Alcoholism, Conditioned Taste Aversion Learning, Food Intake and Body Weight Regulation
David M. Thissen (157), Psychometrics, Item Response Theory, Statistical Models for Developmental Data, Graphical Data Analysis
Eric Youngstrom (230), Bipolar Disorder across the Life Cycle, Emotions, Clinical Assessment, Developmental Psychopathology

Associate Professors

Sara Algoe (250), Role of Emotions in Social Interactions, Cumulative Influence of Positive Emotions
Anna Bardone-Cone (239), Etiology and Maintenance of Bulimia Nervosa with Particular Interests in the Roles of Perfectionism, Self-Efficacy, and Stress; Sociocultural Factors (Race/Ethnicity, Family, Media) in Relation to Body Image and Eating Disorders; Defining "Recovery" from an Eating Disorder
Charlotte Boettiger (234), Cognitive Neuroscience of Addiction, Executive Function, Functional Neuroimaging, Behavioral Pharmacology, Brain Mechanisms of Substance Abuse Treatments, Modulation of Decision-Making by Genetics, Hormones, and Late Adolescent Development
Carol Cheatham (199), Nutrition Individuality and Its Effects on the Development of Cognitive and Social Behaviors
Shauna Cooper (274), Cultural and Contextual Factors that Contribute to Positive Youth Development, African American Adolescents and Families
Stacey Daughters (263), Addictive Disorders, Etiologic Predictors of Disorder Onset, and Predictors of Treatment Failure or Relapse; Distress Tolerance as an Individual Predictor
Jean-Louis Gariepy (153), Development and Evolution of Social Behavior, Early Social Development in Children, Quantification of Social Networks
Kurt Gray (256), Moral Psychology and Mind Perception, Structure of Morality, Emotional Experiences Relative to the Intentions of Others
Enrique Neblett (237), Racism-Related Stress Experiences, Coping, Cardiovascular Psychophysiology, African American Child and Adolescent Mental Health

Assistant Professors

Jessica Cohen (271), Functional Brain Network Interactions and Reconfigurations When Confronted with Charging Cognitive Demands
Kathleen Gates (265), Development and Application of Advanced Statistical Models for the Analysis of Individual-Level Human Behavior and Processing, Novel Methodologies for Detecting Signal from Noise in Time-Series Functional MRI Data
Sylvia Fitting (269), Drug Abuse and HIV-1 Comorbidity, Determining the Cellular, Structural, and Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Opioid Interaction with NeuroAIDS
Kristen Lindquist (257), Emotions and Affective Neuroscience, Basis of Human Emotion
Keely Muscatell (273), Social Experiences Influencing Physical Health and Emotional Well-Being, Incorporating Techniques from Social Neuroscience and Psychoneuroimmunology
Kathryn Reissner (266), Modifications of Cellular Dynamics and Synaptic Strength and Control of Behavior, Brain Changes Stemming from Chronic Exposure to Drugs of Abuse
Margaret Sheridan (270), Neural Mechanisms, Attention-Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder in Early Childhood, Typical and Atypical Development of Prefrontal Cortex
Eva Telzer (272), Adolescent Brain Development, Prosocial and Antisocial Behaviors, Family and Peer Relationships, and Long-Term Psychological Well-Being

Clinical Professors

Erica Wise (214), Psychotherapy with Adolescents and Adults, Legal and Ethical Issues in Clinical Psychology, Training Clinic Outcomes Research
Jennifer Youngstrom (233), Empirically Supported Treatments and Effectiveness Research with Children and Adolescents, Transporting Treatments into the Community, Assessment, Treatment of Childhood Mood Disorders, Supervision and Training

Professors Emeriti

Elliot Cramer
David A. Eckerman
Samuel Fillenbaum
Chester A. Insko
Edward S. Johnson
Richard A. King
Joseph C. Lowman
Robert C. MacCallum
Barclay Martin
Gary Mesibov
J. Steven Reznick
Paul Shinkman
Vaida D. Thompson

PSYC

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate-level Courses

PSYC 400. Conditioning and Learning. 3 Credits.

A comprehensive survey of the methods, findings, and theories of classical and operant conditioning. Skills necessary to evaluate, integrate, and summarize significant original literature will be developed.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101 and 222.
Gen Ed: PL.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: NBIO 400.

PSYC 401. Animal Behavior. 3 Credits.

PSYC 270 recommended. Ethological, genetic, and physiological variables will be studied in relation to their behavioral effects.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101, and PSYC 222 or BIOL 101.
Gen Ed: PL.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: NBIO 401.

PSYC 402. Advanced Biopsychology. 3 Credits.

Elements of neurophysiology, neuroanatomy, and neurochemistry as they apply to the understanding of brain-behavior relationships.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101 and 220.
Gen Ed: PX.
Grading status: Letter grade
Same as: NBIO 402.

PSYC 403. Advanced Biopsychology Laboratory. 3 Credits.

"Hands on" laboratory course designed to introduce students to experimental protocols emphasizing "brain-behavior" relationships. Topics include gross neuroanatomy, stereotaxic surgery, and the effects of drugs on behavior. Honors version available
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101 and 220 or 402.
Gen Ed: PX, EE-Mentored Research.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 404. Clinical Psychopharmacology. 3 Credits.

This course will investigate the pharmacological effects and the clinical efficacy of drugs used to treat behavior disorders.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 101.
Gen Ed: PL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 415. History of Neuroscience. 3 Credits.

In this class, we will consider how neuroscience emerged as a multidisciplinary field. The class will cover key research findings that propelled the field forward. We will also delve into the autobiographies of some of the pioneering researchers who made these important discoveries.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 220 or 315.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 420. Functional Neuroanatomy. 3 Credits.

For advanced undergraduate and graduate students. An introduction to human neuroanatomy, covering function of the neuroanatomy of each major system and relation to neurobehavioral disorders associated with damage to the neuroanatomy of the system.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 220, 315, BIOL 352, or 455.
Gen Ed: PL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 424. Neural Connections: Hands on Neuroscience. 3 Credits.

This class will explore links between the brain and behavior through neuroscience outreach activities. Students will also reflect on the meaning of community engagement. By the end of the semester, each student must complete a minimum of 30 hours of service within the community.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 220 or PSYC 315.
Gen Ed: PL, EE-Service Learning.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 425. Advanced Perceptual Processes. 3 Credits.

The perception of objects and events; the role of cognitive factors in perception.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101 and 220, 225, or 230.
Gen Ed: PL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 426. Molecular Mechanisms of Memory. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on current knowledge about the cellular and molecular basis of learning and memory. Course material focuses primarily on hippocampus-dependent memory, considering behavior, cellular physiology, and molecular and genetic contributions. In addition, we will consider learning and memory disorders, including Alzheimer's disease.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 220 or 315.
Gen Ed: PL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 427. Neurobiology of Aging. 3 Credits.

This course will survey clinical and experimental literature regarding the neurobiology of aging, considering different theories of aging, how aging is studied in the laboratory, and recent findings. Biochemical, molecular, physiological, and behavioral changes associated with both "normal" and pathological aging will be considered.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 220 or 315.
Gen Ed: PL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 428. Neuroscience, Society, and the Media. 3 Credits.

Neuroscience is a "hot" topic in popular media. We will consider media coverage of neuroscientific research by reading the popular press versions of studies alongside the findings from primary sources and what kinds of topics are most often covered by the media and why.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 220 or 315.
Gen Ed: PL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 429. Neuroeconomics and the Science of Consequence. 3 Credits.

This seminar covers current research on psychological, economic, and neuroscientific aspects of decision-making behaviors. Topics include decisions involving risk and uncertainty, decisions that involve learning from experience, and decisions in strategic interactions and games. In addition, we will consider the neural underpinnings of these processes.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 220 or 315.
Gen Ed: PL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 430. Human Memory. 3 Credits.

This course explores classic and current issues in the study of human memory. Topics include working memory, encoding and retrieval processes, implicit memory, reconstructive processes in memory, eyewitness memory, developmental changes in memory, neuropsychology and neuroscience of memory and memory disorders, memory improvement, and the repressed/recovered memory controversy.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101, and 222 or 230.
Gen Ed: PL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 432. Psychology of Language. 3 Credits.

Recommended preparation, PSYC 230 or LING 101 or LING 400. This course examines the mental representations and cognitive processes that underlie the human ability to use language. Covers what people know about language, how they process it, and how people make inferences about the speaker's meaning based on context. Recent work in experimental psycholinguistics is discussed.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 101.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 433. Behavioral Decision Theory. 3 Credits.

Simple mathematical and psychological models of judgment and choice, and related experiments, are treated, as are applications to real world problems in medical, environmental, policy, business, and related domains.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 101.
Gen Ed: PL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 434. Cognitive Neuroscience. 3 Credits.

Introduction to cognitive neuroscience. Higher mental processes including attention, memory, language, and consciousness will be covered, with an emphasis on the neural mechanisms that form the substrates of human cognition.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101, and 210 or 215; and one of PSYC 220, 222, 225, 230, or BIOL 450, 455.
Gen Ed: PL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 437. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory. 3 Credits.

BIOL 101 recommended. This course surveys current knowledge about and research into the neurobiological basis of learning and memory. Using a combination of lectures and student-led discussions, we will critically evaluate the molecular, cellular, systems, and behavioral research that strives to explain how the brain learns and remembers.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101 and 220.
Gen Ed: PL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 461. Cognitive Development. 3 Credits.

An examination of the development of attention, perception, learning, memory, and thinking in normal children.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101 and 250.
Gen Ed: PL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 463. Development of Social Behavior and Personality. 3 Credits.

Developmental processes during early childhood as these relate to social behavior and personality.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101, and 210 or 215.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 465. Poverty and Development. 3 Credits.

Poverty is one of the most consistent and influential risk factors for problematic development. This course focuses on the scientific study of how poverty affects development across the human life span.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101 and 250.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 467. The Development of Black Children. 3 Credits.

PSYC 210 or 215 recommended. A survey of the literature on the development of black children. Topics include peer and social relations, self-esteem, identity development, cognitive development, school achievement, parenting, family management, and neighborhood influences.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101 and 250.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 468. Family as a Context for Development. 3 Credits.

Explores how the family influences children's development. Topics include family theories, genetics, family structure (e.g., single parents, working mothers, divorce), discipline, parent behavior and values and beliefs, fathers and ethnic diversity.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101 and 250, and 210 or 215.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 469. Evolution and Development of Biobehavioral Systems. 3 Credits.

Examines the evolution and development of behavior patterns and their physiological substrates.
Requisites: Prerequisites, BIOL 101 and PSYC 101, 210, or 215.
Gen Ed: PL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 471. The Study of Adolescent Issues and Development. 3 Credits.

The developmental period of adolescence is studied from a multidisciplinary perspective. The course will distinguish among early, middle, and late adolescence and will cover several theoretical perspectives.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101, 210 or 215, and 250.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 472. Racial Discrimination and Minority Youth. 3 Credits.

This course examines the effects of racial discrimination among African American, Latino, Asian American, and Native American adolescents using a psychological perspective to critically examine empirical research. The course examines racial discrimination, power, and equity and is recommended for students interested in serious, thought-provoking discussions.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101, 210 or 215, 250, and 260.
Gen Ed: SS, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 490. Current Topics in Psychology. 3 Credits.

Various special areas of psychological study, offered as needed. Course may be repeated for credit. Honors version available
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 12 total credits. 2 total completions.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 493. Internship in Psychology. 3 Credits.

Required preparation, minimum of two other psychology courses and junior/senior standing. Designed for highly motivated psychology majors interested in exploring professional opportunities in psychology-related areas. Students complete hands-on internships at community sites for approximately 120 hours across the semester. Students also attend a weekly one-hour class with other interns.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 101.
Gen Ed: EE-Academic Internship.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 500. Developmental Psychopathology. 3 Credits.

A survey of theories bearing on atypical development and disordered behavior, and an examination of major child and adolescent behavior problems and clinical syndromes.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101, 245, and 250.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 501. Theoretical, Empirical Perspectives on Personality. 3 Credits.

An in-depth coverage of the traditional clinically based personality theories of the early 20th century contrasted with more recent empirically based perspectives.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 101.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 502. Psychology of Adulthood and Aging. 3 Credits.

A developmental approach to the study of adulthood, from young adulthood through death. Topics include adult issues in personality, family dynamics, work, leisure and retirement, biological and intellectual aspects of aging, dying, and bereavement.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101 and 250.
Gen Ed: SS, EE-Service Learning.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 503. African American Psychology. 3 Credits.

This course examines race and culture in the psychological processes and behavior of African Americans.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 101.
Gen Ed: SS, US.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 504. Health Psychology. 3 Credits.

An in-depth coverage of psychological, biological, and social factors that may be involved with health.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101 and 245.
Gen Ed: PL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 506. Assessment and Treatment of Older Persons. 3 Credits.

Addresses methods to assess, treat, and rehabilitate older person with serious mental health disorders.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101 and 245.
Gen Ed: SS, EE-Service Learning.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 507. Autism. 3 Credits.

Intensive service-learning seminar on autism includes a supervised community placement. Topics include historical diagnostic issues, etiological theories, assessing patterns of functioning, developmental/life span issues, family concerns, and intervention approaches.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101, 245, and 250.
Gen Ed: PL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 509. Applied Behavioral Analysis. 3 Credits.

PSYC 222 recommended. A survey of applications of learning theory in solving clinical, educational, and societal problems. Practicum experience included.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101 and 245.
Gen Ed: SS, EE-Mentored Research.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 512. Popularity, Friendship, and Peer Relations. 3 Credits.

This course will review literature regarding peer relations among children and adolescents, including peer acceptance/rejection, popularity, bases of friendship selection, peer crowds, romantic relationships, and theories of peer influence.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 101.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 514. Mania and Depression. 3 Credits.

The social, developmental, and biological contributions to mania and depression are examined, as well as the impact of these moods on the brain, creativity, relationships, quality of life, and health.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101 and 245.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 515. Psychological Approaches to Prevention Science. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor required. Prevention science is an interdisciplinary field between research and practice, with the goal of developing prevention programs for people's lives. Course will emphasize psychological approaches to preventing substance use as a motivating example. Discussions, lectures, a research project, and an experiential learning component.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 270.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 516. Child Maltreatment, Trauma, and Trauma-Focused Treatment. 3 Credits.

This course offers a multidisciplinary perspective on child maltreatment, including the types of maltreatment to which children are exposed, the prevalence of child maltreatment, and the impact of maltreatment on individual, familial, and societal functioning.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 101.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 517. Addiction. 3 Credits.

PSYC 245 and 270 recommended but not required. This course will provide students with a comprehensive overview of the etiology and treatment of addiction, along with exposure to real-life stories of addiction.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 101.
Gen Ed: PL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 530. Design and Interpretation of Psychological Research. 3 Credits.

Emphasis on the methodological principles underlying experimental and correlational research. Interaction of theory and practice in the design and interpretation of psychological studies.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101 and 270.
Gen Ed: PL, CI, QI.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 531. Tests and Measurement. 3 Credits.

Basic psychometric theory underlying test construction and utilization. Detailed study of issues and instruments used in assessing intellectual functioning, educational progress, personality, and personnel selection.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101, and 210 or 215.
Gen Ed: SS, QI.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 532. Quantitative Psychology. 3 Credits.

This course examines the science of quantitative psychology. Topics include the analysis of data, the design of questionnaires, and the assessment of psychological attributes, among others. Honors version available
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 210 or 215 or SOCI 252 or STOR 155.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 533. The General Linear Model in Psychology. 3 Credits.

Consideration of multiple regression and the general linear model in psychological research, including hypothesis testing, model formulation, and the analysis of observational and experimental data. Honors version available
Requisites: Prerequisite, ECON 400 or PSYC 210 or 215 or SOCI 252 or STOR 155.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 534. Introduction to Computational Statistics. 3 Credits.

Introduction to programming and the implementation of statistical techniques. Topics include data manipulation, graphical procedures, writing loops and functions, data simulation, use of regular expressions, and scraping data from the web.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 210, 215, SOCI 252, or STOR 155.
Gen Ed: PL, QI.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 560. Self and Society. 3 Credits.

PSYC 270 recommended. Content, structure, and functions of the self-concept. How the self-concept is shaped by society and developmental processes; ways in which the self-concept affects perception of others; self-esteem. Class participation and presentations required.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101 and 260, and 210 or 215.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 561. Social Cognition. 3 Credits.

Theory and research in social psychology, which explores the cognitive processes underlying social phenomena. Specific topics covered include attributions, emotions, automaticity, heuristics, self, goals, stereotyping, expectancies, social motives, and others. Honors version available
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101 and 260, and 210 or 215.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 563. Small Groups. 3 Credits.

Intensive survey of research and theory on behavior in small groups combined with appropriate experience in studying various structured groups.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101 and 260, and 210 or 215.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 564. Interpersonal Processes. 3 Credits.

Intensive coverage of normal interpersonal processes, focusing on the dyad.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101 and 260, and 210 or 215.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 565. Stereotyping, Prejudice, and Discrimination. 3 Credits.

PSYC 270 recommended. Examines the determinants, functions, processes, and consequences of stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. Prospects for change are considered. Class presentations and participation required.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101 and 260, and 210 or 215.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 566. Attitude Change. 3 Credits.

A detailed consideration of the theoretical issues in attitude and belief change.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101 and 260, and 210 or 215.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 567. Research in Positive Psychology. 3 Credits.

Majors only. This advanced course in positive psychology is research intensive and intended as a capstone for majors in psychology.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101 and 270, and 210 or 215.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 568. Emotion. 3 Credits.

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the scientific study of emotion. Topics will include theoretical models of emotion process and structure. A range of perspectives, including social, cultural, developmental, clinical, and cognitive psychology, as well as behavioral neuroscience, will be considered.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 101.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 569. Practical Wisdom from Advanced Social Psychology. 3 Credits.

Surveys cutting-edge research across the field of social psychology and how it matters for everyday life. Topics include morality, mind perception, judgment and decision making, happiness, affective forecasting, emotion, relationships, negotiation, personality, free will, stress/health, and religion. Clear communication of research also emphasized through figures, presentations, and papers.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101, 260, and 270.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 570. The Social Psychology of Self-Regulation. 3 Credits.

PSYC 270 recommended. An intensive review of self-regulation theory and research, focusing on the cognitive, motivational, and affective processes involved in goal commitment, monitoring, and overriding behavioral responses.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101, 260, and 210 or 215.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 571. Social Neuroscience. 3 Credits.

Recommended preparation, PSYC 220 or 315. Social neuroscience is the study of how social processes and experiences are represented in and influence the structure and function of the brain. This course will focus primarily on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of humans, though we will also discuss other brain imaging techniques and patient studies.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 101 and 260.
Gen Ed: PL.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 572. Theoretical and Empirical Perspectives on Sex and Gender Differences. 3 Credits.

An in-depth examination of psychological research and theory pertaining to the influence of gender on the lives of men and women. In general, emphasis will be placed on understanding gender as a social psychological construct.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101 and 260.
Gen Ed: SS.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 600. Historical Trends in Psychology. 3 Credits.

Limited to senior majors or to graduate students in psychology; others by permission of the instructor. Overview of the origins of psychological concepts, movements, and fields of study.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 101.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 601. Psychology and Law. 3 Credits.

Examines the legal system from the perspective of psychology methods and research, with a focus on criminal law. Discusses dilemmas within the law and between the legal system and psychology.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 101, and 210 or 215.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 602. Evolutionary Psychology. 3 Credits.

Major topics of general psychology are examined from an evolutionary perspective with an emphasis on empirical studies asking why much current human behavior and experience would have been adaptive for our early ancestors.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 101.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 693H. Honors in Psychology I. 3 Credits.

Required preparation, cumulative GPA of 3.3, psychology GPA of 3.5, one semester of PSYC 395, and acceptance through application to the honors committee. To be taken in the fall of the last year of studies as the first course in the two-semester honors sequence. Students conduct research under the direction of a faculty advisor and receive classroom instruction in research-related topics.
Gen Ed: SS, CI, EE-Mentored Research.
Grading status: Letter grade.

PSYC 694H. Honors in Psychology II. 3 Credits.

Admission to the psychology honors program required. To be taken as the second course in the two-semester honors sequence. Students conduct research under the direction of a faculty advisor and receive classroom instruction in research-related topics.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 693H.
Gen Ed: SS, CI, EE-Mentored Research.
Grading status: Letter grade.

Graduate-level Courses

PSYC 701. Brain & Behavior I. 3 Credits.

Graduate standing required. A survey of psychological and biological approaches to the study of sensory and perceptual information processing, with an emphasis on touch and pain.
Same as: NBIO 701A.

PSYC 702. Brain & Behavior II. 3 Credits.

A survey of psychological and biological approaches to the study of basic learning and higher integrative processing.
Same as: NBIO 702A.

PSYC 703. Advanced Biological Psychology: Central Nervous System. 3 Credits.

Each fall one special topic will be covered in depth (e.g., neural bases of memory storage, homeostasis, and perception). Format includes lectures and seminar meetings with student presentations.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 402.
Same as: NBIO 703.

PSYC 704. Applications of Experimental Psychology to Health Research. 3 Credits.

This course provides a critical analysis of interdisciplinary research within experimental psychology, including such topics as psychopharmacology, psychoneuroimmunology, psychophysiology, and animal models of brain/behavior disorders.
Same as: NBIO 704.

PSYC 705. Behavioral Pharmacology. 3 Credits.

Basic principles of pharmacology and behavior analysis are considered in relation to drugs that affect the central nervous system.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 404; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.

PSYC 707. Clinical Psychopharmacology. 3 Credits.

Examinations of the clinical efficacy, side effects, and neuropharmacological actions of drugs used in the treatment of behavioral disorders. Additional topics include the behavioral and neuropharmacological actions of drugs of abuse.

PSYC 708. Seminar in the Biological Foundations of Psychology. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor. Limited to graduate students in psychology and neurobiology. Lectures and seminar presentations on a wide range of topics in the area of physiological psychology.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit.
Same as: NBIO 708.

PSYC 709. Seminar in Theoretical-Experimental Psychology. 1-3 Credits.

Lectures, discussions, and seminar presentations on current topics in experimental psychology.

PSYC 719. Seminar in Experimental Health Psychology. 3 Credits.

An in-depth treatment of research topics in behavioral and biological aspects of health psychology.

PSYC 720. Research Seminar in Addiction Science I. 3 Credits.

Graduate standing in psychology required. Students design and conduct a supervised research project and engage in critical discussion of research performed by other students and faculty.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit.

PSYC 721. Research Seminar in Addiction Science II. 3 Credits.

Graduate standing in psychology required. Students design and conduct a supervised research project and engage in critical discussion of research performed by other students and faculty.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit.

PSYC 738. Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience: Basic Concepts and Individual Differences. 3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of what the field of human neuroscience has revealed about neural structure and function with an eye to examining individual differences. Current knowledge about the neural mechanisms supporting cognitive and emotional function will be investigated in depth through chapters, review articles, and empirical studies.

PSYC 739. Cognitive Neuroscience. 3 Credits.

This course will highlight recent research regarding the cognitive and neural architecture of human memory or attention, with the emphasis placed on studies using cognitive neuroscience methods (e.g. fMRI, EPRs).
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit.

PSYC 740. Seminar in Cognitive Psychology. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor. Discussion and critical evaluation of various theories of thinking; theories of concept formation, problem solving, and reasoning.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit.

PSYC 741. Professional Development for Careers in Research. 3 Credits.

Graduate standing required. This course covers research strategies, research collaboration, giving talks, writing review papers, writing research reports, the peer-review editorial process, the grant-proposal process, the academic job search process, and nonacademic career.

PSYC 742. Attention. 3 Credits.

Graduate standing in psychology required. This course will introduce the major issues in attention research and highlight recent work examining the neural mechanisms of attention and its interactions with other cognitive and social-cognitive processes.

PSYC 743. Cognitive Aging. 3 Credits.

This course examines theories of human cognitive aging and how these theories seek to explain age-group differences in various domains of cognitive functioning (e.g., episodic memory, language, judgment).

PSYC 744. Psycholinguistics. 3 Credits.

Graduate standing in psychology required. This seminar addresses the mental processes underlying human's ability to use language at a number of levels. Specific topics vary.

PSYC 746. Seminar in Cognitive Psychology - Human Memory. 3 Credits.

Selective overview of topics in the study of human memory Course will examine the findings from laboratory research to gain a better understanding of memory structure and organization.

PSYC 750. Research Seminar in Cognitive Psychology. 3 Credits.

Graduate standing in psychology required. Students conduct a supervised research project in cognitive psychology, and participate in discussion of current research and related ethical and methodological issues.

PSYC 751. Research Seminar in Cognitive Psychology. 3 Credits.

Graduate standing in psychology required. Students conduct a supervised research project in cognitive psychology, and participate in discussion of current research and related ethical and methodological issues.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit.

PSYC 760. Advanced Cognitive Development. 3 Credits.

This course covers the development of attention, perception, learning, memory, thinking, and language, beginning in infancy and covering the life-span from both information processing and Baldwin-Piaget approaches.

PSYC 761. Advanced Social Development. 3 Credits.

Current thinking and research relevant to social, emotional, and personality development across the life span. Topics include parent-child interaction, peer relations, aggression, competence, sex roles, and gender differences.

PSYC 762. Developmental Psychology: Methodology I. 3 Credits.

Philosophical and sociological perspectives on research in developmental psychology, with specific applications to ongoing projects. As announced.

PSYC 763. Developmental Psychology: Methodology II. 3 Credits.

Techniques and research designs appropriate for the study of the development of behavior. Supervised experience in the planning of experiments and data analysis.

PSYC 764. Developmental Assessment. 3 Credits.

Introduction to instruments used for the assessment of development and cognition in infants, preschoolers, and school-aged children, with primary focus on research issues. Practice administration of instruments in field settings.

PSYC 765. Developmental Psychology: History and Theory. 3 Credits.

Drawing upon materials presented in the previous content and method courses, this class examines in-depth various types of developmental theories. As announced.

PSYC 766. Developmental Psychobiology. 3 Credits.

Provides an introduction to psychobiological research, focusing on early development in animals. Topics include embryology, developmental neurobiology, the development of sensory and communication systems, and social behavior. As announced.

PSYC 767. Advanced Family Theory and Research. 3 Credits.

Research related to family processes, especially regarding the developmental consequences of varying family environments on children. Topics include divorce, cognitive development, single parents, parental employment, discipline, cultural context.

PSYC 768. Seminar in Developmental Psychology. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor. Intensive study of selected topics in developmental psychology.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics.

PSYC 780. Developmental Psychology Forum. 1 Credit.

Permission of the instructor. Presentations of research by faculty, students, and visitors; discussion of professional topics.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit.

PSYC 781. Proseminar in Developmental Science. 3 Credits.

Intensive study of selected topics in human development that are being explored by members of the Carolina Consortium on Human Development staff.
Requisites: Prerequisite, permission of the instructor.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit.

PSYC 790. History of Psychology. 3 Credits.

Review of the history of major areas of psychology, with special emphasis on the conceptual and methodological underpinnings of the discipline.

PSYC 791. Special Readings in Psychology. 3 Credits.

Permission of the instructor. Intended for advanced graduate students.

PSYC 792. Professional Problems in Psychology. 1 Credit.

Permission of the instructor. Consideration of problems facing academic psychologists.

PSYC 793. Laboratory in College Teaching. 1 Credit.

Specific training in presentational and interpersonal skills needed by college teachers, such as planning, lecturing, discussing, motivating, and evaluating.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit.

PSYC 795. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. 3 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive and rigorous introduction to the technique of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Students will learn the basic physics underlying MRI; the biological principles of fMRI, the principles of experimental design, data analysis, the use of available software packages, and special considerations for patient research.

PSYC 803. Empirically Validated Approaches to Child and Family Psychotherapy. 3 Credits.

Graduate status in clinical psychology required. This course covers the research bases and clinical application of psychotherapeutic interventions that have demonstrated empirical validity for assisting children and families.

PSYC 804. Empirically Validated Approaches to Adult Psychotherapy. 3 Credits.

Graduate status in clinical psychology required. This course covers the research bases and clinical application of psychotherapeutic interventions that have demonstrated empirical validity for assisting adult clients.

PSYC 806. Clinical Research Methods. 3 Credits.

Graduate status in clinical psychology required. Analysis of clinical and personality research in terms of their contribution to knowledge, their limitations, possibilities for their improvement, further research they suggest, etc. Preparation of individual research proposals for class presentation and critical evaluation. Three hours a week.

PSYC 807. Clinical Research Seminar. 1 Credit.

Graduate standing in clinical psychology required. Designing and presenting research proposals in individual students' research areas in oral and written form. Critiquing research proposals. Research ethics and preparing and evaluating protocols for ethical review.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 806.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit.

PSYC 809. Adult Psychopathology. 3 Credits.

First-year graduate status in clinical psychology required. The major forms of psychopathology are examined within a development framework.

PSYC 810. Developmental Psychopathology. 3 Credits.

First-year graduate status in clinical psychology required. The major forms of psychopathology are examined within a development framework.

PSYC 811. Adult Practicum. 3 Credits.

Second-year graduate status in clinical psychology required. Supervised experience in psychological assessment and psychotherapy. Six to eight laboratory hours a week.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit.

PSYC 812. Child and Adolescent Practicum. 3 Credits.

Second-year graduate status in clinical psychology required. Supervised experience in psychological assessment and psychotherapy. Six to eight laboratory hours a week.

PSYC 813. Advanced Adult Assessment. 3 Credits.

Graduate standing in clinical psychology required. Consideration of how various forms of assessment data can be utilized in understanding the structure and dynamics of adult personalities; problems of differential diagnosis, brain damage, etc., are also considered. Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week.

PSYC 814. Advanced Child Assessment. 3 Credits.

Theory, research, and application of objective and projective techniques for behavioral, emotional, psychiatric, interpersonal, and social cognitive assessment of children and adolescents. Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 808.

PSYC 815. Ethics and Practice in Clinical Psychology. 3 Credits.

Graduate standing in clinical psychology required. A survey and discussion of the ethical and legal issues that clinical psychologists confront in a variety of professional settings.

PSYC 817. Advanced Adult Practicum and Professional Ethics. 3 Credits.

Supervised clinical work in an area of particular interest to the student. Clinical activity is coordinated with reading and discussion of literature or professional ethics.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 811 and 812.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics.

PSYC 818. Advanced Child/Adolescent Practicum and Professional Ethics. 3 Credits.

Individualized clinical practicum for advanced doctoral students in clinical psychology. Supervised experience in psychotherapy, psychological assessment, and consultation. May be repeated for credit.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 817.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics.

PSYC 822. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Credits.

Lectures, discussions, and seminar presentations on current topics in clinical psychology.

PSYC 823. Clinical Supervision and Consultation: Theory, Research, and Practice. 3 Credits.

This course will familiarize fourth year clinical psychology doctoral students with methods and models of clinical supervision and consultation in an ethical and multicultural context. Includes a didactic seminar component and an applied supervision training component . Restricted to fourth year doctoral students in clinical psychology.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit. 3 total credits. 1 total completions.

PSYC 825. Advanced Clinical Practicum. 3 Credits.

Individualized clinical practicum for advanced doctoral students in clinical psychology. Supervised experience in psychotherapy, psychological assessment, and consultation.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 817.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit.

PSYC 827. Multiculturalism and Clinical Psychology. 3 Credits.

Graduate standing in psychology and permission of the instructor. The development and format of this course is guided by current "best practice" in multicultural education in emphasizing three overriding goals: awareness and changes in attitudes and beliefs.

PSYC 828. Child/Adolescent Assessment Practicum. 1 Credit.

Graduate standing in psychology and permission of the instructor. This course provides students with an opportunity to integrate their academic foundation in clinical psychology assessment knowledge skills, ethics, and values in an applied practice setting with diverse clients.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit.

PSYC 829. Clinical Psychological Assessment. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the principles and practices of evidence-based assessment for clinical psychology.

PSYC 830. Statistical Methods in Psychology I. 4 Credits.

Required preparation, a course in introductory statistics. Data analysis, sampling, applied probability, elementary distribution theory, principles of statistical inference.

PSYC 831. Statistical Methods in Psychology II. 4 Credits.

Statistical estimation and hypothesis testing for linear models (ANOVA, ANCOVA, regression analysis); statistical models in the design and analysis of experiments.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 830.

PSYC 840. Computational Statistics. 3 Credits.

Current computational environments for data analysis and visualization are taught and used as a basis for understanding current (and creating new) methods of computational statistics and dynamic statistical graphics.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 831; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.

PSYC 842. Test Theory and Analysis. 3 Credits.

Survey of classical test theory and more recent developments in item analysis and test construction.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 831.

PSYC 843. Factor Analysis. 3 Credits.

Advanced topics in factor analytic models, multivariate correlational models, and analysis of covariance structures as applied in behavioral research.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 831; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.

PSYC 844. Structural Equation Models with Latent Variables. 3 Credits.

Examination of a wide range of topics in covariance structure models, including their history, underlying theory, controversies, and practical use with major computer packages.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 831; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.

PSYC 845. Latent Curve Modeling. 3 Credits.

Latent curve modeling is a structural equations-based method for analyzing longitudinal data. Equal emphasis is placed on the statistical model and applications to real data.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 844; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.

PSYC 846. Multilevel Modeling. 3 Credits.

This course demonstrates how multilevel models (or hierarchical linear models) can be used to appropriately analyze clustered data (i.e. persons within groups) and/or repeated measures data in psychological research.
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 830 and 831.

PSYC 850. Quantitative Psychology Forum. 1 Credit.

Presentations of research by faculty, students, and visitors; discussion of professional topics such as ethics, the publication process, research funding, and the reviewing of articles.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit.

PSYC 859. Seminar in Quantitative Psychology. 3 Credits.

Lectures, discussions, and seminar presentations on current topics in quantitative psychology.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics.

PSYC 860. Directed Research Seminar in Social Psychology. 3 Credits.

Graduate status in social psychology or permission of the instructor. Directed research problems and seminar discussion of related issues.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit.

PSYC 861. Directed Research Seminar in Social Psychology. 3 Credits.

First-year graduate status in social psychology or permission of the instructor. Directed research problems and seminar discussion of related issues.

PSYC 862. Advanced Social Psychology. 3 Credits.

Intensive study of interdependence theory and research of interpersonal relationships.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 867; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.

PSYC 863. Methods of Social Psychology. 3 Credits.

Methods of investigation in social psychology, with primary emphasis upon experimental design and the nature of the experimental situation.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 867; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.

PSYC 864. Topics in Attitude Research. 3 Credits.

A critical examination of selected topics in attitude theory and change.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 867; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.

PSYC 865. Methods of Applied Social Psychology. 3 Credits.

Graduate standing required. Supervised research experience in an applied setting and accompanying methods of non-laboratory research, including nonquantitative methods of social psychology and evaluation of quasi-experimental and nonexperimental designs.

PSYC 866. Interpersonal Processes and Close Relationships. 3 Credits.

Intensive study of the processes by which adult close relationships are initiated and developed.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 867; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.

PSYC 867. Advanced Survey of Social Psychology. 3 Credits.

Graduate standing or permission of the instructor. Survey of research and theories of attitude change, interpersonal relations, and small groups.

PSYC 868. Seminar in Social Psychology. 3 Credits.


Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 867; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.

PSYC 869. Advanced Social Cognition. 3 Credits.

Advanced theory and research in social psychology that explores the cognitive processes underlying social phenomena. Specific topics include attributions, emotions, heuristics, self, goals, motives, and others.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 867; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.

PSYC 870. Psychology of Emotions. 3 Credits.

Graduate standing required. Seminar featuring research and theory on emotions. It stretches across traditional psychological subdisciplines because emotions are complex, multiply determined phenomena.

PSYC 871. Advanced Group Processes. 3 Credits.

Discusses both classic and contemporary theory and research related to group processes, including group performance, motivation, decision-making, social dilemmas, social justice, and other intragroup and intergroup phenomena.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 867; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.

PSYC 872. Seminar in Political Psychology. 3 Credits.

Graduate standing required. This course surveys research in political psychology. Topics may include personality and politics, political values and attitudes, voter behavior, candidate evaluation, and the role of emotion in political decision-making.

PSYC 873. Seminar on Prejudice and Stereotyping. 3 Credits.

Graduate standing required. Seminar reviews classic and current literature on the psychology of stereotyping and prejudice. Focus is on causes, consequences, and mental processes that maintain social biases.

PSYC 874. Social Judgment and Decision Making. 3 Credits.

Discusses both classic and contemporary theory and research related to social judgment and decision making, including basic psychological processes, heuristics and biases, models of decision making, and social influences.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 863; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.

PSYC 875. Advanced Seminar in Positive Psychology. 3 Credits.

Positive Psychology represents a scientific approach to understanding positive aspects of life, inclulding character strengths and human flourishing. This seminar builds students' empirical skills in this vibrant area of inquiry.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 870.

PSYC 876. Graduate Seminar in Social and Affective Neuroscience. 3 Credits.

This course will provide students with an understanding of the more basic biological (and psychological) mechanisms that contribute to social processes such as stereotypes, person perception, moral judgments, and emotions. The course will prepare students to be informed consumers of contemporary neuroscience research.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PSYC 869 or PSYC 870; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.

PSYC 888. Moral Psychology. 3 Credits.

Course explores moral judgments and behavior; examines morality and cognition, emotion, mind perception, and religion; covers debates between reason vs. intuition, utilitarianism vs. deontology, and single vs. multiple domain theories. Discusses real world applications (courtroom, torture) and related concepts (free will).
Requisites: Prerequisites, PSYC 869 or PSYC 870; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.

PSYC 890. Case Formulation and Psychotherapy Integration. 3 Credits.

Required preparation, third year or beyond in clinical psychology doctoral program.This advanced seminar provides clinical psychology graduate students with case formulation skills in the context of exposure to psychotherapy integration and contemporary evidence-based treatment models.

PSYC 904I. Aging and Health. 3 Credits.

Introduction to normal aging, diseases of aging, mental health issues, and the use of health services by older adults.
Same as: SOWO 604I, SOCI 824, DENT 604I, HMSC 904I, MEDI 604I, NURS 782I, PHCY 604I, PHYT 904I.

PSYC 907I. Aging and Public Policy. 3 Credits.

Students learn of social service, health, and income policy with the aged. Issues pertaining to informal support systems and disadvantaged groups are explored in the context of aging policy.
Requisites: Prerequisite, SOWO 530.
Same as: SOWO 607I, DENT 607I, FMME 607I, HMSC 951I, MEDI 607I, NURS 783I, PHCY 607I.

PSYC 991. Advanced Research. 3 Credits.

Six laboratory hours a week.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit.

PSYC 993. Master's Research and Thesis. 3 Credits.

PSYC 994. Doctoral Research and Dissertation. 3 Credits.